The Last Super-Simple Field-Only Armory

Earlier this week, I became curious about the simplest armory designs that remained available for registration in the Society — was it still possible to find two- and four-part field-only armory that didn’t use furs, field treatments, or complex lines?

I spent some time looking at all of the current field-only armory: 219 devices and badges registered over the last forty-eight years. A visual sense of the diversity of these registrations is provided by Vémundr Syvursson’s Field-Only Emblazons project from last year, in which he drew out all 202 of these that had been registered at that time.

It quickly became clear that in order to find any design spaces that remained open, I would need to take advantage of the fact that I had parsed all of the existing records from the Society’s Ordinary and Armorial into a relational database, which allowed me to run queries that would filter and group registrations to produce a summary of which combinations of lines and tinctures had been used in the past.

The results of that analysis suggested some corners of the design space that might be promising, but I still needed to individually conflict-check the combinations I came up with. In response to a question on the Facebook Heraldry Chat group, Marie de Blois pointed out an approach to checking field-only armory I had overlooked, which allowed me to work through a bunch of options in a timely fashion.

In short, to filter the O&A for possible conflicts with field-only two-part or four-part armory such as “Per fess argent and sable,” you can run a complex search with these parameters:

  • PFESS:argent
  • PFESS:~and sable
  • PFESS:sable:~and argent
  • PFESS:pl
  • FO — give this line a weight of 2
  • PO

Any results that appear with a score of 4 or higher are a potential conflict.

I wasn’t sure what I would find at the end of this process — were all of the super-simple options taken, or closed off due to conflicts with more complicated designs — or would I find that there were dozens of options sitting vacant?

The truth turned out to be somewhere between these two extremes: about a dozen opportunities to register field-only designs using the most common two- and four-part divisions with plain lines and solid tinctures.

I wasn’t entirely sure I should publicize the results of my search — should I leave these hidden in obscurity for people to find one at a time over the coming decades? Was publishing a list of them like giving poachers a map to the nesting sites of the last surviving members of a species teetering on the bring of extinction?

In the end, I decided that there was no real harm done by revealing this information, and thus I give you:

  • Per bend vert and purpure.
  • Per bend sinister gules and azure.
  • Per bend sinister purpure and gules.
  • Quarterly purpure and Or — I believe this does not conflict with the existing registration of “Quarterly arrondi sable and Or” thanks to the 2003 precedent (for “Brǫndólfr the Stout”) which grants a DC for arrondi lines in four-part field divisions.
  • Quarterly vert and purpure — or you can replace vert with azure or sable.
  • Per saltire gules and argent.
  • Per saltire vert and argent — I believe this does not conflict with the existing registration of “Per saltire arrondi vert and argent” thanks to the same precedent cited above and the existing registration’s blanket permission to conflict with one DC.

There was room in the per-pale family for one additional registration, or two if they gave each other permission to conflict; the colors involved work well for my wife and I, and so I have filled out the submission forms, and I think that closes out the last per-pale options.

I didn’t find any such opportunities available for the per-fess or per-chevron divisions.

In addition to those narrowly-constrained options, it turned out there was a wider latitude among the less-common per-chevron-inverted fields, where there is room to register a handful more devices. Some possible combinations include:

  • Per chevron inverted argent and purpure.
  • Per chevron inverted Or and gules.
  • Per chevron inverted sable and azure.
  • Per chevron inverted purpure and vert.

In addition to the tincture combinations listed above, there are several other ways you could mix-and match the options for per-chevron-inverted fields; for example, “sable and argent” is still available, as is “Or and vert” — however, “argent and vert” has a conflict. While the number of possible combinations is large, since each item that is registered creates a conflict for a dozen others, there’s only room for about five actual submissions.

In addition to the items listed above, there may be a few more options available thanks to blanket permission-to-conflict waivers on file, or by asking individual submitters for such permission.

And of course, it’s possible that I’ve overlooked something in my search, and there are other unregistered opportunities out there, waiting for some enterprising person to come along and find them: if you decide to go looking, I wish you good hunting!

Available as a PDF file or as a high-resolution PNG.

An Armory Conflict-Checking Checklist

SENA devotes over 10,000 words to conflict checking armory, which the below guide attempts to summarize.

It includes references to the relevant sections of SENA so you can track down more details if needed.


To conflict-check a new piece of armory, search the armorial database to find a list of all existing registrations which could possibly conflict, then review the new item against each of them in turn.

Work through the list below until you find that they are clear of conflict through at least one Substantial Change (SC) or two Distinct Changes (DCs). 

If you reach the end of the list without finding an SC or two DCs, the items conflict and the new one can not be registered without permission to conflict. (A5H)

First, identify the charge groups in each piece of armory. (A3D)

If one piece of armory has a primary charge and the other doesn’t, that’s an SC. (A5E1)

If there is a primary charge group, any of the following changes to it is an SC:

  • Type of all charges are substantially different? (A5E2)
  • Number of charges is substantially different (1, 2, 3, more than 3)? (A5E3)
  • Arrangement of charges is substantially different? (A5E4)
  • Posture or orientation of charges is substantially different? (A5E5)

If there is no primary charge group, any of the following changes to the field is an SC:

  • One field is divided and the other is undivided? (A5F1a)
  • Direction of lines of division has changed? (Number of lines doesn’t count.) (A5F1b)
  • No tinctures in common? Or for divisions into two, three, or four pieces, each section has changed and each item has at least one tincture the other does not? (A5F2)

For the field, each of the following is a DC — however, if there is a primary charge group, you can only get one DC for the field regardless of how many changes there are:

  • Is either item (or both) fieldless? (A5G1e)
  • Tincture changed for at least half of the field? (But if divided into more than four parts, swapping or rotating tinctures does not grant a DC.) (A5G1a)
  • Direction of line of division has changed? (A5G1b)
  • Style of partition line has changed? (A5G1c)
  • Number of pieces is different (1, 2, 3, 4, more than 4)? (A5G1d)

For each of the charge groups, each of the following is a DC:

  • Entire charge group has been added or removed? (A5G2)
  • Type of charge changed for at least half of the group? (A5G4)
  • Tincture changed for at least half of the group? (A5G3a)
  • Addition of division line, or change in direction, style, or number of pieces (1, 2, 3, 4, more than 4)? (A5G3b, A5G3c, A5G3d)
  • Number of charges is different (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, more than 5)? (A5G5)
  • Arrangement of charges in the group is different (and it wasn’t forced by contrast rules)? (A5G6)
  • Posture or orientation of the charges is different? (A5G7)

This checklist is also available as a PDF file or as a high-resolution PNG.

See also: A more-detailed guide that includes visual examples of each of these types of checks is found in Master Modar’s 2015 conflict-checking guide on Calontir’s heraldry site.

Complex Lines Quick Reference

I keep forgetting which complex lines are considered to conflict with each other, so I put together this quick-reference guide in hopes that a visual presentation would help it to sink in.


The edges of field divisions and ordinaries may use any of these complex line styles, with a few exceptions.

Plain lines predominate, but the other styles whose names are underlined are also fairly common in period.

Groups of lines separated by a dotted border are considered to be sufficiently different to have a DC.

Available as a PDF file or as a high-resolution PNG.

Name for Sydoc nicTalmach

Sydoc had a registrable name already picked out, so all that was required was some research to document it as historically accurate.


Sydoc nicTalmach is a Scots feminine name of the sixteenth century.

Sydoc is a feminine Scots given name dated to 1540 found in “A List of Feminine Personal Names in Scottish Records” by Talan Gwynek.

This name was originally found in Black’s Surnames of Scotland, s.n. MacKail.

SENA Appendix C says that English, Scots, and Gaelic name phrases can be combined.

nic is a marker (also spelled nyk/nick/nikc/nik) that appears in 16th century Scots records as a contraction of Gaelic ‘inghean mhic’, meaning ‘daughter of the son of’. Unlike in later Irish Gaelic orthography, no space appears after the marker in Scots.

This is shown in the 1595 records for “Katherene NicClaartie” and “Ewphrick Nikccoll” which appear in “Names from Papers Relating to the Murder of the Laird of Calder” by Margaret Makafee.

These names were originally found in Highland Papers (Scottish History Society, 1914).

Talmach is a Gaelic male given name (sometimes spelled Tolmach). Saint Talmach is a minor saint who was a disciple of Saint Brendan in sixth century Ireland. The name is found in The Book of Hymns of the Ancient Church of Ireland by James Henthorn Todd, 1855.

Another Round of Traceable Art

Over the last month I’ve added another 135 illustrations to the Book of Traceable Heraldic Art.

As with last month, these are drawn from a variety of sources, including some more beasts from Torric inn Björn, some tools and objects from Gustav Völker, and a couple of funky lions from Thomas Wriothesley.

Below is a summary of the new entries; each includes a single illustration unless a number is provided in parentheses, and represents a new heading unless marked as an addition.

  • Ordinaries: 2 Bars Wavy (1 additional); 3 Bars Wavy; Base Wavy Barry Wavy; Bend Indented (1 additional); Bordure Denticulada (1 additional); Bordure Dovetailed; Chief Indented; Fess Indented; Fess Wavy (1 additional); Pale Indented; Pallium; Saltire Engrailed
  • Shapes & Symbols: Chi-Rho; Cross Of Toulouse (1 additional); Fleur de Lys (1 additional); Suffolk Knot; Label of 5 Points Throughout (1 additional)
  • Plants: Broom Sprig Fructed; Carrot (1 additional); Fig Sprig Fructed; Garlic Bulb (1 additional); Hemp Leaf; Laurel Wreath (2 additional); Mandrake; Female Mandrake; Oak Tree Fructed and Eradicated (1 additional); Onion; Raddish (2 additional); Rose (2 additional); Tree (1 additional)
  • Invertebrates: Stag Beetle Statant (1 additional)
  • Fishes: Crayfish; Dolphin (1 additional); Lucy (1 additional); Sea-Lion (1 additional)
  • Reptiles: Dragon (1 additional); Dragon Passant (1 additional); Dragon Statant (2 additional); Pithon Volant (2 additional); Serpent Glissant (1 additional); Two Serpents Entwined; Wyvern Sejant Tail Nowed
  • Birds: Falcon Jessed (1 additional); Falcon Hooded and Jessed; Feather (1 additional); Martlet (1 additional); Pelican Vulning Itself (1 additional)
  • Beasts: Alphyn Rampant; Antelope Salient; Antelope’s Head Cabossed; Antelope’s Head Erased; Bear Couchant Head Lowered; Bear Rampant (1 additional); Bear Sejant Affronty; Bear Statant Affronty; Bear’s Head Erased and Muzzled (1 additional); Beaver Rampant (2 additional); Boar Passant (1 additional); Boar Rampant (2 additional); Boar Sejant; Bog Beast; Pair of Buffalo’s Horns; Bull’s Massacre; Camel Couchant; Camelopard Passant; Chameleon; Cat, Domestic, Couchant Head Lowered; Dog Passant Guardant; Dog Rampant (1 additional); Dog Rampant Collared; Goat Salient (1 additional); Griffin (1 additional); Lamb Passant; Lamb Passant Regardant; Lamb, Paschal, Regardant; Lion Queue Fourchy (1 additional); Lion Passant (2 additional); Lion, Winged, Passant Regardant; Lion’s Head Erased (1 additional); Mouse Statant (1 additional); Pegasus Segreant (1 additional); Ram’s Head Couped; Rhinoceros; Squirrel Maintaining A Nut; Stag Courant; Stag Rampant Collared and Chained; Stag’s Attire (1 additional); Stag’s Attire In Annulo; Stoat Passant (1 additional); Unicorn Passant (1 additional); Unicorn, Winged; Wildcat’s Head Cabossed; Wolf’s Head Erased (1 additional); Yale Rampant (1 additional)
  • People: Arm Vested Fesswise With A Hand Of Benediction; Arm Fesswise Maintaining A Club; Ass With A Jester’s Head Passant; Centaur Passant (1 additional); Centaur Sejant Brushing Her Hair; Centaur Sejant Drawing A Bow; Sole Of A Foot; Maiden’s Head Couped and Hooded Facing Dexter; Man Robed; Man Vested and Maintaining a Scythe; Melusine (1 additional); Mermaid (1 additional); Merman, or Triton (1 additional); Monk Robed and Maintaining a Book; Moor Passant; Saracen’s Head Affronty Erased Maintaining a Torse (1 additional); Seraph (1 additional); Viking With Arms Raised
  • Objects: Andirons, Pair of Dog-Headed; Barnacles, Pair of (1 additional); Barrel (1 additional); Bridge, Twin-Towered, Of A Single Arch; Bridge, Triple-Towered, Of Two Arches; Bucket with Handle (1 additional); Buckle (1 additional); Cloth Hung Over A Rod; Column (1 additional); Comb; Compass, Drawing; Cornucopia Effluent (1 additional); Crown; Harp (1 additional); Key (1 additional); Mill; Pipe, Tabacco, Enflamed; Rods, Bundle of; Sail; Spade (1 additional); Tower (1 additional); Open Well (2 additional); Wheel of Fortune

An Early Roll of Arms of the Canton of Whyt Whey

In the period of 2003-2005, an armorial roll was assembled for members of the Canton of Whyt Whey by Doña Sancha de Flores.

The pages were preserved at archive.org (1, 2) and I thought they might be interesting as a snapshot of local participants from that time.

Attached below is Doña Sancha’s roll as of 2005; sadly, several of the emblazons were not preserved by the archive.


Name: Alexandre Lerot d’Avignon
Blazon: Per pale wavy purpure and argent, a serpent, glissant palewise and sinister facing, argent and a wolf rampant sable
Registered: March 1987 via the Outlands
Badge: Per pale wavy purpure and argent, a serpent, glissant palewise argent and a wolf rampant sable

Name: Aethelstan St. Maur
Blazon: Argent, a trefoil slipped azure between in chief two crosses swallowtailed gules.
Registered: January of 1987 via the West

Name: Cael Hen Godebog
Blazon: Or, a triple branched candlestick sable, on a chief azure a mullet of eight points Or.
Registered: Unknown

Name: Dearbhforgaill an Chomhaidh
Blazon: Vert, on a bend argent between two plates three lions rampant palewise vert.
Registered: November 2003

Name: Edward Zifran of Gendy
Blazon: Lozengy sable and ermine, a baton sinister gules.
Registered: January of 1974 (via the West)

Name: Ervald La Coudre the Optimistic
Blazon: Azure, chape argent, three legs flexed and conjoined in pall at the hip Or, a base argent.
Registered: January 1990

Name: Jibril al-Dhakhil
Blazon: Argent, a falcon rising sable and on a chief rulgey vert a decrescent and a sun argent
Registered: No

Name: Jan van Antwerpen
Blazon: Quarterly argent and azure, in bend two lymphads azure
Registered: Name registered April 2003.

Name: Judith the Uncertain
Blazon: Per pale and per chevron argent and azure, two trefoils and a crescent counterchanged
Registered: February 1987

Name: Medb ingen Muiredaich
Blazon: Vert, three garbs argent
Registered: In process

Name: Pamela Gattarelli
Blazon: Sable, a bend engrailed to base Or between two pineapples
Registered: Name registered April 2003.

Name: Sancha de Flores
Blazon: Gules, a columbine argent
Registered: Name registered November 2002. Arms registered October 2003.

Name: Seán Ó Súilleabháin Beirre
Blazon: Gules, on a pile argent a turtle purpure
Registered: Name & Arms, January 2003

Name: Tauna Ælswith (Tona the Black)
Blazon: Azure, a crescent inverted between two piles inverted argent, each charged with a crescent inverted azure.
Registered: April 1990

Name: Umbar in Harchiral Dandachi
Blazon: Argent, chaussé polyé cotised and in chief a kindjal dagger palwise inverted sable surmounted by a madu shield fesswise gules
Registered: July 1981

Name: Wolfgang Rotkopf
Blazon: Or, an abacus sable, a chief rayonny gules.
Registered: July of 1990 via the West
Badge: (Fieldless) An abacus sable.

Recent Art Additions

Over the winter holidays I took some time to add another 156 illustrations to the Book of Traceable Heraldic Art.

Many of these are drawn from the Viking Answer Lady’s SVG Images For Heralds, while others come from historical documents including Insignia Florentinorum (Italy, 16th C) and Opus Insignium Armorumque (Slovenia, 17th C), and some have been newly illustrated for this collection.

Below is a summary of the new entries; each includes a single illustration unless a number is provided in parentheses, and represents a new heading unless marked as an addition.

  • Fields: Semy of Crosses Cletchy
  • Divisions: Per Fess With A Single Embattlement; Per Pale Urdy (2)
  • Ordinaries: Bordure Counter-compony
  • Shapes & Symbols: Annulets, Five, Interlaced In Cross; Compass Rose (2 additional); Cross Moline Disjointed; Cross Of Calatrava; Hexagon; Knot, Cavendish, or Savoy Knot; Mullet of 8 Points (1 additional); Mullet of 8 Mascles Interlaced; Nailpuller, Japanese; Nailpullers, Four Japanese, Two and Two; Pentagon; Triquetra (1 additional); Triquetras, Cross of; Umebachi
  • World & Heavens: Crescent (1 additional); Goutte (1 additional); Gurges (1 additional); Moon, Increscent (1 additional); Rainbow (1 additional); Ray of the Sun Issuant From Dexter Chief
  • Plants: Banana; Créquier; Garlic Bulb; Garlic Plant (1 additional); Geranium Flower; Jasmine Flower; Laurel Wreath (1 additional); Linden Branch; Linden Leaves Issuant From The Line, Per Bend; Magnolia Flower; Orange Flower; Poppy Flower (1 additional); Tree Issuant From A Mount
  • Fishes: Dolphin (2 additional); Dolphin Embowed; Fish Haurient; Fish Embowed; Fish, Flying; Lucy (3); Lucies, Three, Fretted (1 additional); Sea-Fox Naiant; Sea-Fox Naiant Guardant; Sea-Horse (1 additional); Sea-Lion (1 additional); Sea-Lion Naiant; Sea-Monster’s Tail (3 additional); Sea-Serpent Erect; Sea-Serpent Undulant (1 additional)
  • Birds: Auk, Great; Bat (1 additional); Bird (1 additional); Cock, Double-Headed; Cock Head Erased; Crane (1 additional); Duck’s Foot; Eagle (4 additional); Eagle, Double-Headed (1 additional); Eagle’s Head Couped; Eagle’s Head Erased (1 additional); Eagle’s Leg Erased (1 additional); Egg; Goose; Heron (1 additional); Hummingbird Hovering; Hummingbird Rising; Magpie Displayed; Peacock (1 additional); Peacock In His Pride (2 additional); Pelican Vulning Itself (1 additional); Pheasant Volant; Phoenix (1 additional); Raven (1 additional); Raven Displayed (1 additional); Raven Migrant (1 additional); Raven Regardant; Raven Rising; Raven Rising Displayed; Raven Rising Displayed Regardant; Swallow Volant (1 additional); Swan Naiant (1 additional); Vol (2 additional); Wing (3 additional)
  • Objects: Aspersorium and Aspergillum; Barnacles, Pair of (1 additional); Battle-Axe, Double-Sided (2 additional); Besom; Bridge of One Arch (2); Bridge of Two Arches (1 additional); Bridge of Three Arches (1 additional); Bridge Throughout of Two Arches; Bridge Throughout of Three Arches (1 additional); Buckle, Square, Trefoiled At The Corners; Candle Enflamed On A Candlestick (2 additional); Castle of Three Towers (1 additional); Castle of FIve Towers; Cleaver; Cornetto, Tenor; Coronet, Ducal (1 additional); Crown, Eastern; Cup (1 additional); Cupping Glass; Fetterlock, Closed (1 additional); Fishhook (1 additional); Flag (1 additional); Fleshpot (1 additional); Footbridge; Footbridge Throughout; Glove; Glove Aversed; Glove Fesswise; Gonfalon (2 additional); Grappling Iron; Hammer (1 additional); Harpoon (2); Hat, Jew’s (2 additional); Key (1 additional); Knife (1 additional); Knife, Pruning; Ladder; Meat, Spit of (2); Oar; Rake; Ring, Gemmed (2); Rope, Annulet of (1 additional); Scythe (1 additional); Spade (1 additional); Streitgabelklinge; Tower (2 additional); Wall; Wall Couped; Wheel (1 additional)

Book Heraldry Symposium in Lion’s End

On December 1, I was pleased to meet with a group of aspiring and intermediate heralds from Østgarðr and its neighboring Barony of An Dubhaigeainn to offer over five hours of classes in the practice of onomastics and armorial design and registration in the Society for Creative Anachronism.

My thanks to Lilie Dubh inghean ui Mordha for her capable teaching assistance, especially on the names side, and to Sláine báen Ronán for writing up a description of the event for publication in the East Kingdom Gazette, reproduced below with her kind permission.


The fighting season has ended – Eastern minds and hands turn to indoor pursuits; Repair and Replace armor bits, sew new garb, or embellish something you already own, take a class…

Students hard at work at the Book Heraldry Symposium.
Photo courtesy of Baroné Francesco Gaetano Gréco d’Edessa

In Østgarðr’s Canton of Lion’s End Seahorses and neighboring Ducks of an Dubhaigeainn gathered together for a Heraldry Symposium.  The agenda was set to teach and learn about Heraldry and Heralding. Lady Lilie Dubh inghean ui Mordha, Pantheon Herald in the EK Submissions Office, and Lord Mathghamhain Ua Ruadháin, Seahorse Pursuivant of the Crown Province of Østgarđr and the Elmet Herald of the East Kingdom, taught a 5 hour session on the intricacies and idiosyncrasies of being a Working Book Herald, walking the class through the process of how a Device, Badge, and Name go from an Idea to Registration; what are the rules of construction for a name? How do you fill out those registration forms? Lilie and Mathghamhain accessed and projected onto a big screen the websites actually used, performed actual searches for names, and showed off the latest tips and tricks available to smooth the pathway of Conflict Checking and Documentation for both Names and Armory.

The Symposium was cozily attended by members from  Østgarđr and An Dubhaigeainn. Good questions and informative discussion were all around.  It was deemed to be a successful first meeting, with a hope for a Heraldry 102 class. That could happen in the near future, either Live or Virtually, with a tentative Focus on the use of OSCAR (Online System for Commentary and Response), what to say and how to say it.

Respectfully submitted
Sláine báen Ronán
Drake Pursuivant

Barleycorn Court Report

On the eighth day of September, in year fifty three of our society, their Excellencies Østgarðr, Suuder Il Kha’an and Lada Il-Khatun, returning home from their recent victories in the summer’s war, did progress to their canton of Northpass for the Feast of John Barleycorn, and therein did hold court.

Their Excellencies began by inviting all newcomers, who had attended no more than three events, to present themselves, and they expressed their pleasure to see the great number of gentles who stepped forward. Each of the newcomers was given a seahorse candle as a token of the province’s welcome and was invited to return again soon, and the populace cheered for their continuing participation.

Next their Excellencies requested to speak with a representative of the Barony of An Dubhaigeainn, and Lady Fiona the Volatile did make herself known, being Seneschal of that Barony’s Canton of Hawkes Reache. Their Excellencies described a request that had reached them from their noble neighbors to the east, who wished to hunt the wild rock doves which are found in the parklands of Østgarðr, in order that they might nurture their populace at the upcoming Feast of Saint Andrews. Being filled with love for their cousins, their Excellencies did grant this boon, delivering unto said Lady Fiona a decree allowing Prefect Titus and his representative Vetra trys Kaukoles to capture said poultry within their borders.

(Scroll by Onora inghean Ui Ruairc.)

Their Excellencies next wished to hear the results of the day’s fencing tourney, and called for their champion Brendan Firebow, who had organized that trial. Lord Brendan spoke of the many fencers who had taken the field that day, recognizing Aesa Sturludottir as the winner of the day’s duels. There had also been a tournament to select Lord Brendan’s successor, and Alexander MacLachlan was named as the victor and new Provincial Fencing Champion. Their Excellencies bade Lord Alec join their entourage, and gave Brendan a necklace of green stones as thanks for his service over the previous year.

For a report on the archery contest, their Excellencies called for Conor Ó Ceallaigh, but that gentle demurred, stating that that the day’s challenge had been run by Arnbiorg Niálsdóttir, called Helga, and that lady did stand forth. She asked two archers to present themselves for acknowledgment, beginning with Lady Elizabeth Hawkwood, whose excellence had impressed all on the range that day, and their Excellencies presented her with a tassel to use in cleaning her arrows. Then Helga did announce Catelin Straquhin as the winner of the Provincial Archery Championship. Their Excellencies thanked Lord Conor for his service as their previous champion, and he delivered the regalia of that position to Lady Catelin, and their Excellencies invited her to join their company.

(Scroll by Lada Monguligin.)

Next their Excellencies called for the results of the day’s youth armored combat, and heard from Eikaterine tin Elliniki, the East Kingdom’s Deputy Earl Marshal for Youth Combat. She told of the number of children who had fought that day, including several newcomers who donned armor for the first time. Following a closely-fought series of bouts, Alaxandair Morda, called the Mountain, had won the Province’s Championship for a second year, and her Excellency Lada asked him to hold her great hammer in court and stand ready should it be needed.

Then Sir Edward Zifran of Gendy was invited into court. He presented the Viceregals with a gift of sweets from the far-off lands of Ealdormere, which all assembled agreed would make a nice light snack. He did then call up two combatants who had braved the challenge he set before the fighters that day, Lord Robert and Lord Ronan FitzRobert. He praised the knowledge, chivalry, and fighting skills of both, presenting them with Ealdormerean treats, and naming Lord Ronan the day’s victor.

Richard the Poor of Ely then presented the results of the brewing challenge that had been held that day. He summoned two gentles before the court, naming as winners Fiona the Volatile for the quality of her historical documentation, and Oliver de Bainbrig for the variety and excellence of his brews.

Their Excellencies next recognized the event stewards who had labored diligently to make the day possible, being Wilhelm Larsson, as well as Archubeas Grimoire, speaking highly of their efforts. Their Excellencies proceeded to read a roll of many names, enumerating those gentles who had assisted with various facets of the weekend’s activities, and recognizing them each with the Award of the Sea Star, at which the populace did give cheer.

The Il-Khanate did then speak about of their desire to recognize the work of younger members of the province who had contributed much to the vibrancy of the Province, and did announce a new award, the Order of the Sea-Urchin of Østgarðr.

To initiate the ranks of the new order, their Excellencies did first call forth young Benjamin of Northpass, praising his tutelage of the populace in period gaming, as well as his participation in dance and many other aspects of local events. He was presented with an embroidered hood as the regalia of the order, and an illuminated manuscript to mark the occasion.

(Scroll by Lada Monguligin)

Next their Excellencies called for Lord Alaxandair Morda, and inducted him into the same order, acknowledging his prowess in battle, his labors lugging heavy burdens at events, and his service in their court, presenting him likewise with a hood and warrant.

(Words and illumination by Lada Monguligin; calligraphy by Suuder Saran.)

Then the Viceregals asked Mongu Chinua to step forward, and spoke of his great skill with a bow, and his leadership and years of teaching within the Province’s archery community. They felt this excellence deserved to be recognized, and so they called forth their Order of the Silver Sea-Lion and made him a member, and he was greeted by his counterparts in the order, receiving a tippet from the last member so inducted, and cheered by the populace.

Lastly, their Excellencies recognized Lord Conor, who had begged their indulgence for a presentation to the province. Said gentle did proceed to unveil a stained glass panel decorated with the sea-horse insignia of the province, made by his hand and enclosed in a wood frame by Mongu Chinua. Lord Conor explained that he knew the province was moving towards commissioning viceregal coronets and offered the stained glass panel to be auctioned off at a future date with the proceeds being used to fund that commission. Their Excellencies thanked him for his gift, and all assembled did admire his handiwork.

Their being no other business before them, their Excellencies did thereupon close their court and retire in anticipation of the evening feast.

These were the events of the day as recorded by their Excellencies’ Herald, Mathghamhain Ua Ruadháin.